In mockery of Jeane Napoles

A response to the disgraceful reaction from Rappler and a UP student  |  

By John Gabriel Pabico-Lalu, Editor-at-Large  |

IF YOU GOT IT, then you have a big responsibility.

“Why can’t Jeane Napoles take pictures of the stuffs she owns?”  I’ll answer the question of Mr. Chad Osorio, author of the commentary posted of the online resource site Rappler, entitled “In defense of Jean Napoles”.

Jeane+Napoles+qRoYKtWGcMcm

Living at the top of the world. (Photo from www.zimbio.com)

A lot of people are not offended just because they cannot afford what is on her hands.  After all, a lot them value the intangibles rather than the ones concrete: people cherish family and affinity over money and jewelry; love for brethren and faith in God instead of lavish footwear and millions of dollars’ worth of residences.

Heck, I’d even trade what Napoles has to watch Gilas Pilipinas live.

It was really done in bad taste.  Sure it was never a crime to be proud of what you have, but delicadeza states that you do not assert your wealth while a lot of your countrymen are deep-sixed in poverty.

The idea that “Social media networks are specifically designed so that people can connect” is basically true, but the use of these social networking sites in order to increase one’s social value is essentially a personal choice.  It is an option: you may use the internet for advocacies, or on the other side of the fence, non-sense matters.

Wait, is increasing one person’s social value and social climbing different?

A lot of the masses may have been deprived of quality education, but they do not lack the wisdom.  In fact, the wisdom resides with the masses.

And I tell you, they would never respect a person like Napoles.

Modesty aside, I am respected by my fellow students and writers, being the editor-at-large of this particular online site.  Sometimes, I am feared, as much as I regret being so.  But I never needed a picture with Justin Bieber in order to be respected.  I never needed an 80 million property in Los Angeles, California to be loved.  I never needed a military man-father in order to be feared.

Napoles’ arrogance shows with the fact that she is more likely to talk with the A community alone.  Yes, we have never heard of her until this scandal blew up –– and we are in many ways thankful that the scandal blew up.  This is a wake-up call to all other Filipinos who have the same lifestyle.

For God’s sake, if you do not want communism, then shun that selfish attitude.

Osorio mentioned that “I (Osorio) doubt she intended poor people to read it in the first place they don’t even know who Lacroix or St. Laurent is, and they do not understand the social value of a $3,000 designer bag one uses for everyday wear.

That is an understatement: the poor are belittled because they cannot live up to the standards of quality that Napoles has.  Remember that communism existed because of the abusive intentions of the capitalists.

I-have-this-you-don’t?  It is such a pity why people show off a worldly life; is it impossible for her to show pictures of her conducting outreach programs?  Even for the sake of publicity?  In Tagalog, “kahit pakitang tao o pampalubag-loob man lang”?

There is no shade of doubt

It is not even a question of guilt in regards to the allegations of graft and corruption pitched at her family.  Filipinos, especially those who can feed thousands of mouths and fill thousands of stomachs, have a responsibility to shoulder his or her fellow Filipino who struggles with his or her everyday life.

Having gold bars in one’s pocket is not wrong: however, it becomes incorrect when what other people have in their pockets are stones and sand.  It is a devious act of greediness.

Everyone is free to form their own ideas.  Be it a student from the University belt, a journalist inside the walls of Intramuros, or a University of the Philippines student, we are allowed to express what we want.

Here’s the twist though: Osorio is a former iskolar ng bayan: a UP Diliman College of Law student.  His first loyalty is expected to be with the public.  Can he bear the truth, that while he is out there taking shots of fashion statements and trends and seemingly sympathizing with Napoles, a lot of Filipino children are dying from hunger and curable diseases?

I’m pretty sure Osorio will have a hard time coping with all the criticisms, especially because he hails from a university where activism is widespread and leftist movements are proliferating.

Is it freedom of speech?  Yes.  Are these expected actions from a UP Student?

No, never.  Not in a million years.

A society filled with stereotypes would tell us that it expects these things from a De La Salle University student.  UP students are expected to be cynical regarding issues –– a double-edged sword, actually.

The brilliance and cynical nature did not show up though: half of Osorio’s arguments are invalid.  What a shame for Rappler and Diliman.

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47 responses to “In mockery of Jeane Napoles

      • There’s a one-year window if you’re going to take a leave of absence from the College of Law. Osorio has gone beyond that and has therefore forfeited his chances of coming back.

  1. Light-year is a measurement for length, not time. I heard the same mistake committed in episode 48 of My Husband’s Lover.

    • We’d bet that our editor used it as a figurative expression, but hey, you’re absolutely correct! Thank you for educating us! About the small glitches, we’re really sorry. Hope you read the other interesting articles! :)

    • ‘distance’, to be more accurate. but good catch!. and because of that, i’ll watch ep 48 of MHL again.

  2. A grammar note: “stuff” is a collective, uncountable noun. The singular and plural form for stuff is stuff. “Stuffs” is bad English.

    • That’s from the Rapper article, that’s why our editor placed quotation marks before and after it. He forgot the ‘sic’. It seems that the article was edited though. Haha. Thanks anyway! Hope you stay safe if you’re a Filipino affected by the rains! :)

      • Sayang!Screenshot na lang sana ang ginamit to quote Osorio’s ugly article para naman na-preserve yung mga mali nya. Para kahit paano eh mabawasan ang kayabangan niya. Anyway, salamat sa magandang article na ito :)

  3. If you watched the Inquirer interview video, there is man in maroon to Napoles’ right side. He appears in Jeanne Napoles 21st birthday video. Who is he?

  4. What a well-written stupid article from a narrow-minded author. Prime example for good journalism. *apply sarcasm here*

    “Is it freedom of speech? Yes. Are these expected actions from a UP Student?

    No, never. Not in a million years.”

    So UP students do not have freedom of speech if they speak against the public’s interest?

    Mr Osorio’s article did not defend Jeanne Napoles’ lavish lifestyle; he defended her right to say, in this case post, what she wants. Fortunately, Mr Osorio has a mind of his own.

    You are a good example of the human sub-specie homo sapiens sheeple.

    And no I am not a UP student. My school wont even show up in the top 100 schools. But I do know how to think for myself.

    • When our editor said the line,

      “Is it freedom of speech? Yes. Are these expected actions from a UP student? No, never. Not in a million years.”

      he was referring to the public perception, that UP students/ graduates are EXPECTED to be siding with the public. Of course, we think it should not have to be like that. That has been the expected action for decades. That has been the stereotype. Our editor never said that Osorio does not have the freedom to speak, especially after saying that what he (Osorio) did is freedom of speech.

      That is why he added in the latter parts, “UP students are expected to be cynical regarding issues –– a double-edged sword, actually.”

      Contrary to popular belief too, journalists are not mere analysts of current events. Contrary to popular beliefs, we take sides. We have responsibilities, and our first loyalty is to the public: in a country where majority of the people are either living below poverty lines or struggling to cope up with their everyday lives, who would you prioritize?

      We’d ask you the same question our editor asked Mr. Osorio:

      Can you bear the truth, that while you are defending Mr. Osorio’s stand, and defending Napoles’ right to take pictures of her stuff, a lot of Filipino children are dying from hunger and curable diseases?

      “Sure it was never a crime to be proud of what you have, but delicadeza states that you do not assert your wealth while a lot of your countrymen are deep-sixed in poverty.”

      • “That has been the expected action for decades. That has been the stereotype.”

        But that’s exactly what’s wrong. Just because I am “X” means I have to follow “Y.” By saying Osorio should have condemned Napoles’ posting of those items when the matter being discussed is the ability to post or not; NOT that it is right or wrong. Was it “right” that Napoles posted those? Yes because it is her choice. Was it right that she used her money (in a certain point of view) improperly? Probably not. But if you were to compare that against a Paris Hilton posting the same photos, would people say it’s wrong too? Or if it was a local celebrity? Probably not.

        But the next argument will be, “it’s money stolen from the public.” 1) It has yet to be proven; 2) How many times has a child questioned the parent where the money came from? 3) At the risk of sounding ignorant since I haven’t bothered to read up on Jeanne Napoles: Did she have the opportunity to work her ass off to buy those herself? Still possible since she may have connections that can place her in a position where she is financially capable.

        ALSO, I highly doubt everyone who studies in UP or is an alumnus of UP thinks that they are stereo-typically expected to “side” with the people. I know because my sister studied there. My son is studying there as well.
        ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

        “Contrary to popular belief too, journalists are not mere analysts of current events. Contrary to popular beliefs, we take sides.”

        This I cannot argue with. It’s a given. BUT as a journalist, the primary objective is to deliver UNBIASED reports. You can take sides as a person but you have to remain neutral in terms of the report.

        Given a scenario, would you “take sides” if you’re report would expose a dear friend because that friend is peddling drugs?

        That is the reason why I said it’s crappy. Then again, in retrospect, this was more of an editorial so I might have made a mistake.
        ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

        “Delicadeza.”

        Such an archaic behaviour.

        So many times have we been compromised by delicadeza. For example, just because I collect Dollfies does not make me care less for those who are not as financially capable as I.

        My Hot Toys collection does not mean I am asserting my financial capability.

        And if I post these online, it’s because I want to show it. NOT shove it up someone else’s ass.

        So can I bear defending Osorio’s post and Napoles’ right to post? YES.

        Am I condoning Napoles’ purchases? NOT MY RIGHT. Unless we prove it’s from my hard earned tax money.

      • TYPO:
        Given a scenario, would you “take sides” if *your* report would expose a dear friend because that friend is peddling drugs?

      • We agree with you sir, that it is just wrong to expect everyone coming out of UP to have similar views regarding an issue. We said “stereotype exists”, but we never said, “we agree to the stereotypes”. First of all, that is human nature – to pick a choice, and sometimes, unpopular choices. Napoles had a choice, Osorio had a choice, and our editor had a choice. And as much as you are doing – criticizing our editor’s choice, I think he also has a right to criticize what he thinks is improper.

        Well, it’s no secret that our editor despises Osorio and Napoles, but at the same time, he also despises Paris Hilton and those local celebrities. He is not a fan of mainstream media. His influences are in fact, underground bands and politicians such as Richard Gordon and Juan Flavier.

        He never talked about the possibility of Napoles’ use of stolen money, because it has yet to be proven.

        “Everyone is free to form their own ideas. Be it a student from the University belt, a journalist inside the walls of Intramuros, or a University of the Philippines alumnus, we are allowed to express what we want.

        Here’s the twist though: Osorio is a former iskolar ng bayan: a UP Diliman College of Law student. His first loyalty is expected to be with the public. Can he bear the truth, that while he is out there taking shots of fashion statements and trends and seemingly sympathizing with Napoles, a lot of Filipino children are dying from hunger and curable diseases?”
        ———————————————————————–

        Obviously, it is an editorial collumn. And if a report assigned to one of our reporters concerns his or her friend who is peddling drugs, then the editors would have assigned that to another person – the same reason why Korina Sanchez does not report on matters concerning the DILG.
        ————————————————————————

        The problem is, Napoles’ collection are not scale models, but true cars.

    • @Robert Arciaga
      “I do know how to think for myself” You are right. I Agree with you, 100%!

      Similarly, I have a mind of my own too and I know how to think for myself — you and your comment are stupid, you are a good example of a whining-idiot in defense of a fellow gay-idiot. I’m not trying to be sarcastic and I meant what I said. You may gay-whine all you want with the way I think but I don’t care. After all, as you said — we are free to think what we want!

      P.S.
      Your comment is smug, so don’t ever expect for a polite response.

      • There’s no need to bash the person. Anyways, if it is her money or the people’s money, we’ll see soon enough. For now the only thing that’s very wrong with this whole scenario is that the whole Philippines wants her mother in jail and everyone’s waiting for her to be proven guilty. Then she decides to post very expensive things and her photos with celebrities in the internet? It’s not a smart move. If my parents are accused of thieving and the country rallied for them to be thrown in jail, I would disappear from the public eye and I would definitely not live a lavish life because that would make people more agitated and a lot more sure that my parents are thieves. By the way, it doesn’t matter what school you come from. I come from one of the top universities and honestly if anyone would say that it’s okay for her to live a lavish life while everyone’s sure that her family stole this country’s money, I mean, jeez. Where’s the common sense in that.

    • And that’s why you cannot get the point of the author. Because you never studied in UP. Please, before you comment, think twice or thrice. Especially if you do not have any first hand experience.

      For UP students, the value instilled in them is to hold public and moral interest before anything else.

      And no, the author is not ‘a good example of the human sub-specie homo sapiens sheeple.’ but you. If I will stereotype, I’ll say, ‘you never studied in UP Diliman, so you cannot comprehend what we think, much more what we envision.’

      • @Xerxes Dela Peña: “you never studied in UP Diliman, so you cannot comprehend what we think, much more what we envision.”

        WOW

  5. This Jeane Napoles has the right to take pictures of her possessions and share them on any social networking site. That said, if she made these photos accessible to the public, then of course those who have a thing or two or three to say about it (and are able to) would comment on the photos, one way or another. Fair enough.

    But really, what does being a UP student / alumnus got to do with discussing this issue? Why even mention it? I don’t know if that Mr. Osorio was the first to do it in his “In Defense of Jeane Napoles” article, or if the one who wrote this article (“In Mockery of Jeane Napoles”) is simply criticizing Mr. Osorio for not embodying the usual qualities of a UP student. Either way, it’s off topic.

    • Our editor emphasizes on the lack of compassion of some Filipinos towards their poor countrymen. Of course, behind every person is a specific kind of upbringing and a particular influence from education.

      Let’s face it: considering that those words came from a De La Salle U student, it would have not been so surprising. But from a University of the Philippines student? Jaw-dropping.

      These are stereotypes the society set, and stereotypes we conform to, though each one of us wants to be different.

      So, the damage done by defending a person who throws lavish parties is doubled when the defender comes from the UP, because, as we have said earlier, they are EXPECTED to side with the public interest.

      But that is just a side dish, no wonder why our editor placed it at the end, just to have some kick to his article. The focal point of the article is still, the insensitivity of some people.

      We hope we answered your questions. Thank you! Have a good day ahead. :)

  6. Well, if some people don’t see anything wrong with basing their “expectations” on the name of the school that the person went to, then I suppose that’s on them.

    If they are more inclined to feel disappointed in seeing and hearing a UP Diliman student “defend” this Jeane Napoles as opposed to hearing and seeing a DLSU or an ADMU student do the same, instead of being disappointed that they had to hear it from anyone at all, regardless, then what the heck.

    It’s not that I don’t understand that it has been the norm. It’s just that it would be nice if people knew that the norm doesn’t always apply. Then their jaws wouldn’t drop as often.

    And thank you for reminding me that your editor only mentioned in passing Mr. Osorio’s connection to UP Diliman, although that doesn’t make it any less out of place. But I suppose that was just you (or your editor) writing based on what you (or he) expect from UP Diliman students. Well, this is just one of your readers responding.

    I appreciate your time. I hope this pork barrel scandal doesn’t go down in history as simply that—a scandal.

    • Thank you sir. As young journalists, we too hope that this issue would not be overshadowed by other issues. Thank you for dropping by and for sure, your inputs are very much appreciated! :)

  7. I’m not as bright as you are guys but following news about this girl really disgust me. I mean, yes, we are not restricted to post pictures of whatever we have. But i think hers were too much. I thought i drowned with all those blogs and pictures about her shoes, jewelries, bags, cars, even those units in L.A. I just can’t imagine people could spend like that without thinking what other people would say. I feel sorry for her, though. Then having read Osorio’s article completely disappointed me. While this article explains what i felt about this whole thing and it’s cool. It’s all about Delicadeza.

  8. I’m not as bright as you are guys but following news about this girl really disgust me. I mean, yes, we are not restricted to post pictures of whatever we have. But i think hers were too much. I thought i drowned with all those blogs and pictures about her shoes, jewelries, bags, cars, even those units in L.A. I just can’t imagine people could spend like that without thinking what other people would say. I feel sorry for her, though. Then having read Osorio’s article completely disappointed me. While this article explains what i felt about this whole thing and it’s cool. It’s all about Delicadeza.

  9. I don’t agree with the Rappler author AT ALL but The author’s piece doesn’t/shouldn’t reflect the institution he came from. This is too shallow

  10. That glaring shade against the author as well as his academic background is really unnecessary and quite shallow. He just gave an account on behalf of the accused- a benefit of the doubt moment if you will. If anything, you’re the ones who came out as judgmental emphasizing heavily on the institution he came from.
    I’m also quite disgusted with the ongoing PDAF scam and have some contradicting beliefs with Osorio. However as a scholar, we know the heavy burdens that are expected from us but that doesn’t mean that we should only restrict ourselves with the public’s opinion. Remember, there’s always two sides to a story.

    • If we’re not mistaken, the writer of this column alloted seven out of all the 24 paragraphs for the relation between Osorio and the institution where he comes from. And in those paragraphs, he did not even stress that Osorio should be cynical against Napoles’ acts, because he is a UP student.

      Well, if you may argue that the sub-head of the column’s title says “A response to the disgraceful post from Rappler and a UP Student”, that’s just because Osorio identified himself as a UP Student, not as a fashion photographer.

      We may have different opinions. From the editor’s standpoint though, it is disgraceful. What we are happy about is that everyone in his or her right mind is happy, and at the same time, mad that this scandal was made public. Hope we find the truth behind it! :)

  11. It would’ve been fine if Napoles was from a really rich family — like likes of Ayala, Lopez, Sy, etc. In a way, it won’t be too vulgar. (Though the rich families do not flaunt their things in social media – they don’t need to) But knowing that Napoles’ family is not rich at all? And all of a sudden their “riches” are shoved at our faces? The more ordinary people would hate jeane and her parents. I’ve never even seen celebrities flaunt too much in social media! Even Paris Hilton has variety in her posts! And sarap magmura!!!! @$!^$*$^@* nyo Napoles!!!!

  12. I liked your article. I did not finish all the comments though. nakakapagod basahin ung mga corrections ng ibang reader ~ lol. keep this up :)

  13. this article is good but i think comparing Osorio to other UP students who are cynical and brilliant is one kind of REALLY stupid stereotype. you should have just stated what’s wrong about his article regardless of what university he came from.

    • We value your comments as much as we value the other comments, but come to think of it, shouldn’t it be that the ‘brilliance’ part isn’t a stereotype for UP students? After all, not everyone gets the chance to study at UP, because ‘only’ brilliant people can get to UP. Just saying. Have a good day! :)

  14. I have read osorios’s blog too and I’m very disappointed just like you. This is a great article of yours. Can I share this in my facebook account?

  15. This is the most insubstantial article I’ve read, in my honest opinion.

    You focus too much on the form– on stereotypes, pakitang tao, pampalubag loob, delicadeza, the very typical Filipino traits that condemn us.

    ‘It is such a pity why people show off a worldly life; is it impossible for her to show pictures of her conducting outreach programs? Even for the sake of publicity? In Tagalog, “kahit pakitang tao o pampalubag-loob man lang”?’ Diba dapat kanya-kanya yan?

    If Jeane is into fashion, why not? It’s like you’re saying that fashion designers out there or people with living off their passion with things that do not concern the ‘intangibles,’ in your words, such as your very modest allusion of you being feared and respected as a writer, are living their lives in banality.

    So are you saying chefs, businessmen, and other people who focus on concrete things such as food and money shallow? Should Monique Lhuiller (famous Filipina fashion designer), or maybe even Louis Vuitton not pursue their passion in fashion and trends because people are suffering in Africa, in the middle east, in South America, in our own country? That’s really one big reason why we don’t succeed. We often confuse self-assurance with arrogance; we should be humble and have delicadeza. It’s a shallow Filipino trait. It really is.

    I’m not saying Jeane Napoles is living her life in passion, heck, I don’t know about that– for all I care she may just be well a greedy daughter of the infamous Janet, and I’m not defending her, but I just want to point out your very twisted perspective of what people should do or should be just because she is Filipino, that it’s as if you’re almost dictating a person to live up to the Filipino standard of being a humble, modest one because we were brought up that way as a society and because of our fellow countrymen who are in deep-seated poverty, or that she should be cynical regarding issues just because she’s from UP.

    “Is it freedom of speech? Yes. Are these expected actions from a UP Student?

    No, never. Not in a million years.

    A society filled with stereotypes would tell us that it expects these things from a De La Salle University student. UP students are expected to be cynical regarding issues –– a double-edged sword, actually.”

    Why are you submitting yourself to the world of stereotypes? Isn’t that, in itself, a twisted thing? You stereotype Osorio too much, and then you contradict your very thought that “everyone is free to form their own ideas,” and giving too much examples of those everyone for that dramatic effect, such as being a student from U-belt, a journalist in Intramuros such as yourself, or a UP student.

    If you disagree with Osorio, that’s your opinion. Even I do in some ways. But the angle you chose to present your argument– pointless. Arguing through stereotypes, that’s trivial, and you should know that.

    Jeane may or may not be a victim of mass media bombardment– she may or may not be aware of where her mother gets the money, and if you condemn her for being the inevitable daughter of the greatest thief the Philippines has ever encountered, I don’t have anything against that. It’s inevitable that we Filipinos should somehow accuse her in some ways or hold this grudge against her, after all, what Janet is alleged of doing is way beyond forgiveness, and she happens to be the offspring of one accused evil witch. And after all, her pictures were one of the triggers of this pork scam blow up.

    For that we should probably even thank her.

    • Good day! I am John Gabriel Pabico-Lalu, Editor-at-Large of The Muralla, and the author of this article.

      First of all, thank you for all the comments, because honestly, I learn a thing or two about it. As much as I criticized Mr. Chad Osorio’s piece, you guys are free to say anything about it. :)

      You know, I think I know what my problem is. I never get to explain to you guys who I am. For the record, I am a God-fearing person with disregard and disdain for religion, and I am in favor of activism, and of progressive and aggressive ideas but I do not sympathize with communism movements.

      I also do not approve of stereotypes. As a metal/ grunge/ rap metal/ reggae vocalist, there are so many labels that are attached with me: Anti-Christ, genre-hopper, marijuana smoker – yet I chose to live through it.

      What I am trying to say is that Osorio, being aware of the stereotypes that cannot be easily removed, should be prepared to face criticisms hurled at him. While I do not approve of stereotypes, he used his credentials as a UP student to indentify himself (see Rappler article)

      Yet @spaznit, I stand by what I said.

      FIRST POINT: Filipino traits do not condemn: it is the people who do condemnation.

      SECOND POINT: I never got your point in the fourth paragraph. What do you mean by me, seemingly saying that what the people into fashion are doing things without novelty? Again, for the record, I hate fashion because in my opinion, it is a trivial matter. In a world full of chaos, why bother to spend time designing inanimate pieces of cloth? If you argue that the money used in fashion goes to several charities, why not pitch in the money directly?

      THIRD POINT: Well-off chefs, businessmen, and other people who focus on money without the intention of helping their fellow men are indeed, shallow. Of course, the common man should strive in order to live through each day. But if you studied economics, man’s resources are limited – which means that there is a finite amount of wealth. How can a poor construction worker improve his living standards when the rich are getting richer? Naturally speaking, the poor worker would be poorer, because his resources cannot even satisfy his needs.

      FOURTH POINT: Remember, no man is an island. If you happen to pass by a wounded man, would you not help him?

      FIFTH POINT: What’s with you guys? I never said that he is completely wrong for saying things like that. He may be wrong in my eyes, but you can make him a deity as much as you want to. And my basis is not even because he comes from UP. My basis is because he defended a person whom I loathe. In the latter paragraphs of the article, I switched from being the communicator into an observer, by subliminally asking things from my readers. I never said that I approve of the stereotypes, but can we at least expect brilliance from a UP student?

      SIXTH POINT: My argument is not based on stereotypes, but on apathy.

      SEVENTH POINT: We cannot accuse Napoles of using stolen money because she has yet to be proven guilty. Actually, if you don’t mind, try to ask the Philippine Daily Inquirer about the real amount of the pork barrel scam, because we think it is overrated.

      In the end, we know that we want the same thing: prosecute the guilty, protect the weak. Now that her mother surrendered, let’s monitor what will happen.

  16. This is the most insubstantial article I’ve read, in my honest opinion.

    You focus too much on the form– on stereotypes, pakitang tao, pampalubag loob, delicadeza, the very typical Filipino traits that condemn us.

    ‘It is such a pity why people show off a worldly life; is it impossible for her to show pictures of her conducting outreach programs? Even for the sake of publicity? In Tagalog, “kahit pakitang tao o pampalubag-loob man lang”?’ Diba dapat kanya-kanya yan?

    If Jeane is into fashion, why not? It’s like you’re saying that fashion designers out there or people with living off their passion with things that do not concern the ‘intangibles,’ in your words, such as your very modest allusion of you being feared and respected as a writer, are living their lives in banality.

    So are you saying chefs, businessmen, and other people who focus on concrete things such as food and money shallow? Should Monique Lhuiller (famous Filipina fashion designer), or maybe even Louis Vuitton not pursue their passion in fashion and trends because people are suffering in Africa, in the middle east, in South America, in our own country? That’s really one big reason why we don’t succeed. We often confuse self-assurance with arrogance; we should be humble and have delicadeza. It’s a shallow Filipino trait. It really is.

    I’m not saying Jeane Napoles is living her life in passion, heck, I don’t know about that– for all I care she may just be well a greedy daughter of the infamous Janet, and I’m not defending her, but I just want to point out your very twisted perspective of what people should do or should be just because she is Filipino, that it’s as if you’re almost dictating a person to live up to the Filipino standard of being a humble, modest one because we were brought up that way as a society and because of our fellow countrymen who are in deep-seated poverty, or that she should be cynical regarding issues just because she’s from UP.

    “Is it freedom of speech? Yes. Are these expected actions from a UP Student?

    No, never. Not in a million years.

    A society filled with stereotypes would tell us that it expects these things from a De La Salle University student. UP students are expected to be cynical regarding issues –– a double-edged sword, actually.”

    Why are you submitting yourself to the world of stereotypes? Isn’t that, in itself, a twisted thing? You stereotype Osorio too much, and then you contradict your very thought that “everyone is free to form their own ideas,” and giving too much examples of those everyone for that dramatic effect, such as being a student from U-belt, a journalist in Intramuros such as yourself, or a UP student.

    If you disagree with Osorio, that’s your opinion. Even I do in some ways. But the angle you chose to present your argument– pointless. Arguing through stereotypes, that’s trivial, and you should know that.

    Jeane may or may not be a victim of mass media bombardment– she may or may not be aware of where her mother gets the money, and if you condemn her for being the inevitable daughter of the greatest thief the Philippines has ever encountered, I don’t have anything against that. It’s inevitable that we Filipinos should somehow accuse her in some ways or hold this grudge against her, after all, what Janet is alleged of doing is way beyond forgiveness, and she happens to be the offspring of one accused evil witch. And after all, her pictures were one of the triggers of this pork scam blow up.

    For that we should probably even thank her.

  17. I agree on many points, especially that it is distasteful for one to flaunt one’s wealth considering so many others have so little.

    That said, Ayn Rand would not approve of this:

    “Filipinos, especially those who can feed thousands of mouths and fill thousands of stomachs, have a responsibility to shoulder his or her fellow Filipino who struggles with his or her everyday life.”

    Also, the pro-communist undertones of this post are troubling.

    The Napoles family have a responsibility to RETURN the billions they stole that rightfully belonged to the Filipino people. But no one is obligated to share what they have earned with others who have less. I’m speaking generally, of course, and not in defense of the Napoles clan.

    People have a right to be selfish if they are selfish with WHAT THEY EARN, not selfish with WHAT THEY STEAL. This makes them jerks, yeah, but it doesn’t make them criminals.

  18. Thank you for this article! More power to you and God bless…

    I also would like to share what Shakira Sison when said in Twitter 9/9/13:
    “I wish sometimes for others to treat my writing like a painting. Artists never seem to apologize for that extra line or an inaccurate rendition, or for someone’s accidental offense. The viewer either likes it or does not, stops looking and moves on. He does not ask for an explanation, a clarification, or a revision the way we demand of writers. So I think sometimes that the solution is to treat my own work like a painting and let it stand on its own, to remain final, to please some and offend others. Maybe when it remains static and permanent like a picture can the reader be satisfied with liking or disliking it, and also move on.”
    Tweet 9/9/13

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